Holiday Schedule

It’s the half way mark for school holidays here in Victoria, and it can be a difficult time for kids who rely on the structure and routines of school to understand what is happening in their day.

To help kids understand what’s going to happen each day, you could use a visual schedule. I’ve made some pictures using the Boardmaker software to go with some of the activities we often do with kids during the holidays. Print them out, laminate them and pop some Blu-tak on the back, and stick them up on a wall at home. Then use them to talk with your child about what you’ll be doing during the day. You can also use them at the end of the day to chat about what you did earlier!

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Visual Schedule

Agosci 2017 – Part 1

Last week I attended a day of the Agosci 2017 conference and it was superb! I caught up with former clients and workmates, colleagues, and met lots of wonderful people committed to sharing knowledge about Augmentative and Alternative Communication.

Colleen Pearce, Public Advocate, began the day with an interesting presentation about her role in protecting the rights of Victorians who have a disability.

Dr. Cathy Binger’s keynote address made a big impression. We watched a cute YouTube clip of a two year old boy at a supermarket and Dr. Binger categorised his language into four language domains:

  1. Pragmatics (the reasons we communicate e.g. asking questions, commenting, requesting)
  2. Semantics (vocabulary and the types of words we use e.g. nouns, verbs, adjectives)
  3. Syntax (how we put words together in sentences e.g. subject-verb-object statements, questions with inverted auxiliary verb “Can I…?”
  4. Morphology (the little bits of language e.g. plurals, prepositions (“in”, “on”), prefixes, suffixes, contractions)

Dr Binger’s analysis challenged the popular notion that kids’ speech is dominated by requesting and highlighted the need for clinicians to target a wider range of pragmatic functions.

She recommended that we collect information about the child’s understanding of language (receptive language skills) and use language data regarding typically developing kids to offer expressive language options in line with the child’s receptive skill level.

Dr Binger spoke about the pitfalls of aligning with a particular AAC language system or vocabulary option. Instead, we should consider the individual’s needs and how each AAC option could address them. Immediate language requirements were contrasted with a person’s long term language needs and Dr Binger outlined how she uses activity displays in conjunction with the person’s AAC system to address this issue.

Her take home message: “Four domains for today, four domains for tomorrow”.

Communicating Without A Shared Language

I’ve recently returned from a trip to Beijing, China and had the unique opportunity to experience communication in the absence of a shared language. Despite the obvious language barrier, I met lots of great people who were keen to chat about my smallest travelling companion (my two year old son). Through the use of pointing, gestures, natural signs and some guesswork, I muddled through with people and was able to interact quite successfully!

Here are some of the things that travelling reinforced for me:

  • Travelling with a toddler is a great conversation starter!
  • You can make an educated guess about the kinds of things people want to know about you when you are visiting another country (e.g. “Where are you from? How long are you visiting?”)
  • Having some visual aids like a map or photos makes communication so much easier. We quickly learnt to favour restaurants with photo-based menus, where we could point out what we wanted to eat and had a reasonable understanding of what we had ordered
  • People seem to really appreciate your effort in attempting to say “please” and “thank you” in another language. My toddler also learnt how to say “Xie xie” for “thank you” and uttering this guaranteed lots of attention!

Session Planning

A lot of work goes into creating a client-focussed session plan at The Communication Toolbox. Session planning typically includes:

  • Consulting with you to ensure that your goals are targeted in sessions
  • Creating resources that assist you to achieve your communication goals
  • Designing activities that create opportunities for you to practise specific communication skills
  • Reviewing the speech pathology literature to ensure that the communication strategies we implement are evidence-based and informed by the latest research